Define Non Importation Agreement

The final non-import agreements in 1774 were initiated by the Continental Congress which founded the Continental Association. Non-import agreements led to the Boston Tea Party Boston traders and traders cut their imports of British goods by almost half. Unfortunately, the other port cities and the colonies themselves did not take over the non-import policy of Boston traders, which thus undermined their boycott efforts. This failure in cooperation meant that trade between England and the colonies was sufficient. British traders had not felt a threat in these mediocre efforts and did not advocate for the repeal of the Townshend Act. The Sons of Freedom were determined to enforce non-import agreements, raising awareness of colonial abuses against British rule. The actions and protests of the Sons of Liberty have shifted from peaceful gatherings, organizing boycotts and small covert actions to public demonstrations of riots and violence. The above intimidating communication by the Sons of Liberty against merchant William Jackson clearly shows one of the methods they employed to enforce non-import agreements while getting the settlers to act. The merchant in question, William Jackson, may also have been publicly “heady and plerated.” The NON-IMPORT AGREEMENTS were a series of trade restrictions introduced by American settlers to protest British revenue policy before the American Revolution. The British Stamp Act of 1765 triggered the first non-import agreements. In protest at the unsalisting taxation, New York traders collectively agreed to embargo British imports until Parliament lifted the stamp tax, and they convinced merchants in Boston and Philadelphia to do the same.

Under pressure from British exporters who lost business, Parliament cancelled the Stamp Act within a year. Although Sons of Liberty`s involvement in non-import agreement issues is indisputable,[5] they were not the only ones to oppose British rule. At the time without British luxury goods, tea or textiles, there seemed to be a chance for patriotic women to play a role in public affairs. [6] Although they did not join the public protest, they formed a strong group called Daughters of Liberty. Instead, they contributed to the manufacture of goods when non-import agreements came into force and resulted in deficits for British products, especially textiles. . . .