Indian Oil And Gas Canada Collective Agreement

The Negotiations, Contracts and Research Division continued to implement agreements that were competitive with provincial royalty rules through close collaboration with all stakeholders. The Negotiations, Contracts and Research Division was able to ensure that any new and amended provisions recommended in the past fiscal year provided First Nations with a higher return than the Royalty Regimes in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Workers in former employment groups 1 to 6 must be assigned to categories D to H in the new system of employment groups according to their activity. Under the collective agreement, they are classified in the immediately higher minimum wage of each job category, with previous years of service having no relevance – the worker is always attached to the first year of the new stage. Such minimum wage increases can be set off against existing (unassumed) payments. If, according to the collective agreement, the old minimum wage is higher than the new minimum wage of the fifth stage, the worker must nevertheless be attached to this level. The difference between the new minimum wage and the old minimum wage is counted as “reform amount 1” and increased each year as conventional wages (a “reform amount 2”, which may have to be paid for transfers before November 1, 2019, is not discussed here). This “Reform Amount 1” cannot be set off against existing overtime payments or used to pay for overtime, overtime, bonuses, commissions, allowances, allowances or travel allowances. The amounts of the reforms must be included in the basis for calculating the rights according to wages. One of the IOGC`s main tasks under the TLE process is to help secure replacement agreements for third party interests that existed before the land became reserve land under an TLE law. The IOGC replaces oil and gas-related agreements, usually from provincial titles and jurisdictions, which can then be managed in accordance with the Indian Oil and Gas Act and its regulations as soon as land reserves become federal. Operationally, persistently low global oil and natural gas prices have led to: (1) a shift from dry gas games to oil and liquid-rich gas games; and 2) fewer wells drilled.

. . .